Manuscripts in the Making: Art and Science

Cambridge-conference

CONFERENCE - Manuscripts in the Making: Art and Science, International Conference organised by the Fitzwilliam Museum, Department of Chemistry, Lensfield Rd, Cambridge CB2 1EW, 8 – 10 December 2016.

In association with the Departments of Chemistry and History of Art, University of Cambridge, with support from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation and the Association for Manuscripts and Archives in Research Collections.

In conjunction with COLOUR: The Art and Science of Illuminated Manuscripts, 30 July – 30 December 2016. A major exhibition to mark the Bicentenary of the Fitzwilliam Museum. major exhibition to mark the Bicentenary of the Fitzwilliam Museum.

This interdisciplinary conference will aim to break new ground in integrating recent advances in the art historical and technical analyses of illuminated manuscripts with research in social and intellectual history. While Western illuminated manuscripts from the 6th to the 16th centuries will form a major focus of discussion, the conference will also include papers on Byzantine, Islamic and Pre-Columbian material.

PROGRAM

8 December 2016

* Prof. Stephen Elliott (Department of Chemistry), University of Cambridge, Welcome
* Dr Stella Panayotova (The Fitzwilliam Museum), University of Cambridge, Introduction.

SESSION 1, Bristol Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre
* Dr Heather Pulliam (Edinburgh University), What do the Multiple Hands and Colours of the Corbie Psalter, Book of Kells and Trier Gospels Tell us about Early Medieval Attitudes towards a ‘Finished Product’?
* Susie Bioletti and Dr Rachel Moss (Trinity College, Dublin), The Art and the Pigments: A Study of Four Insular Gospel Books in the Library of Trinity College Dublin
* Prof. Andrew Beeby and Prof. Richard Gameson (Durham University) and Dr Catherine Nicholson (Northumbria University), From Cairo to Canterbury: Pigments of English Illuminators from the Tenth to the Twelfth Century
* Dr Lucia Pereira Pardo (The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge), The Materials and Techniques of English Manuscripts of the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries. 

SESSION 2, Bristol Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre
* Dr Lieve Watteeuw (Catholic University of Leuven), The Shape of Colour: Exploring the Surface of Paint Layers in Illuminated Manuscripts from the Low Countries
* Dr Paola Ricciardi (The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge), New Discoveries on the Fitzwilliam Book of Hours
* Dr Giulia Bertolotti and Dr Paola Ricciardi (The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge), Simon Bening’s Palette and Painting Techniques in the Hours of Albrecht of Brandenburg.

SESSION 3, Bristol Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre
* Marcus Fraser (Independent scholar), Origins and Modifications in the Blue Qur’an and other early Islamic manuscripts
* Prof. Robert Hillenbrand (Edinburgh University), The many uses of colour in the Great Mongol Shahnama
* Sonya Quintanilla (Cleveland Museum of Art), Drama in Repetition: Narrative Strategies in Serial Paintings from Sultanate and Early Mughal Manuscripts of India.

9 December 2016
SESSION 4, Bristol Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre
* Dr Doris Oltrogge and Dr Robert Fuchs (Cologne Institute for Conservation Sciences), The Vadiana Rudolf von Ems: Collaboration and Painting Technique in a Fourteenth-century Upper Rhenish Illuminators’ Workshop
* Dr John K. Delaney, Dr Kathryn Dooley, Dr Damon Conover, Dr Lisha Glinsman, Dr Giorgio Trumpy and Michelle Facini (National Gallery of Art, Washington DC), Use of Multi-Modal Chemical Imaging Spectroscopy to Study Illuminated Manuscripts on the Macroscale.

SESSION 5, Pfizer Lecture Theatre
* Dr Elizabeth Morrison (J. Paul Getty Museum), Seeing a Pink Elephant: Creating Meaning through Colour in the Medieval Bestiary
* Dr Deirdre Jackson (The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge), The Colours of Fortune.

SESSION 6, Bristol Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre
* Prof. Maria João Melo and Prof. Maria Adelaide Miranda (New University of Lisbon), Between Tradition and Innovation: Lorvão Apocalypse in the Portuguese Monastic Scriptoria
* Dr Catarina Pereira-Miguel, Évora University), Scientific Study of Cistercian Illuminated Manuscripts – Techniques, Aesthetics and Religion.

SESSION 7, Pfizer Lecture Theatre
* Dr Nicholas Herman (University of Montreal), Colour versus Gold: Disgruntled Digressions in a Late Medieval Workshop
* Roger Wieck (Morgan Library & Museum), Tours 1500.

SESSION 8, Bristol Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre
* Nancy Turner (J. Paul Getty Museum) and Dr Catherine Patterson (Getty, Conservation Institute), Materials of Byzantine Illumination: ‘Centre’ and ‘Periphery’ .

* Dr Costanza Miliani, Dr David Buti, Prof. Antonio Sgamellotti and Prof. Brunetto Giovanni Brunetti (CNR-ISTM & SMAArt Perugia), and Dr Davide Domenici (University of Bologna), Colourful Memories: Non-invasive Investigations of Mesoamerican PreColumbian and Early-colonial Codices.

SESSION 9, Bristol Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre
* Bryan Keene (J. Paul Getty Museum), Dyers, Weavers, and Illuminators: Evidence from the Florentine Ordinamenti e Matricola della Compagnia di Sant’Onofrio (1338)
* Magnolia Scudieri (Museum of San Marco) and Dr Marcello Picollo (CNRIFAC, Florence), Fra Angelico and His Circle: the Materials and Techniques of Book Illumination
* Eowyn Kerr-Di Carlo (Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London), Making the Cardinal’s Missal: Looking anew at the Circle of Lorenzo Monaco and the Illuminators of Fitzwilliam MS 30.

SESSION 10, Pfizer Lecture Theatre
* Dr Maurizio Aceto (Università degli Studi del Piemonte Orientale) and Cheryl Porter (Director of the Montefiascone Project and Consultant to the Conservation Department at the Library of Alexandria in Egypt), Looking for Lichen, Fooled by Folium and Tricked by Tyrian: A Brief Tour and New Research on Purple in Manuscripts
* Dr Lea Olsan (University of Louisiana at Monroe), Pigmenta: Materials for Painting and Healing
* Dr Mark Clarke (New University of Lisbon), Recipes and Reception: Mediaeval English Amateur Illuminators.

SESSION 11, Bristol Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre
* Nancy Turner (J. Paul Getty Museum), Reflecting a Heavenly Light: Gold and other Metals in Medieval and Renaissance Manuscript Illumination
* Cheryl Porter (Director of the Montefiascone Project and Consultant to the Conservation Department at the Library of Alexandria in Egypt), Metals in Cambridge Manuscripts
* Prof. Dr Robert Fuchs (Cologne Institute for Conservation Sciences), Gold or Brass, Silver or Tin: Non-destructive Analysis of Metals in Precious Medieval Book Illumination.

10 December 2016
SESSION 12, Bristol Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre
* Dr Cecilia Panti (University of Rome Tor Vergata) and Dr Greti Dinkova-Bruun (Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, Toronto), Robert Grosseteste’s Treatise De iride: Transmission, Reception, Meaning
* Dr Donal Cooper (Department of History of Art, University of Cambridge), Vision and colour in the works of Giotto and his contemporaries
* Prof. Simon Gilson (School of Modern Languages and Cultures, University of Warwick), Optics in Dante and in Italian vernacular culture, 1300-1600.

SESSION 13, Pfizer Lecture Theatre
* Dr Haida Liang and Dr Chi Shing Cheung (Nottingham Trent University, and Dr Paola Ricciardi (The Fitzwilliam Museum), A study of illuminated manuscripts using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and other complementary non-invasive techniques
* Dr Luca Nodari (CNR-IENI Padova), FT-IR spectroscopy as a non-invasive tool to investigate pigments and binders in illuminated manuscripts
* Stijn Legrand, Frederik Vanmeert, Dr. Geert Van der Snickt and Prof. Dr Koen Janssens (University of Antwerp), MA-XRF scanning of illuminated manuscript fragments
* Dr Carola-Bibiane-Schönlieb (DAMT, University of Cambridge), Mathematical approaches for virtual art restoration.

SESSION 14, Bristol Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre
* Dr Mike Huxtable (Durham University), [I]nitium habuit ab aliquo milite histrione vel gaudente…: Grosseteste’s De colore and the Colouring of Chivalry in BL Add. MS. 28791
* Prof. Lucy Freeman Sandler (New York University 6), Seeing Red: The Use of ‘Gules’ in the Pictorial Imagery of Fourteenth-Century English Manuscripts
* Dr Holly James-Maddocks (University of Birmingham), John Bray, Limner-Binder, and Three Sequences of Manuscripts Illuminated in Oxford (1450-1484).

SESSION 15, Bristol Myers Squibb Lecture Theatre
* Dr Lucia Burgio (Victoria & Albert Museum), Manuscripts at the Victoria & Albert Museum
* Dr Christina Currie, Dr Steven Saverwyns and Dr Dominique Vanwijnsberghe (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage IRPA-KIK, Brussels), The Spanish Forger Exposed: An Interdisciplinary Study of Two Paintings
* Dr Stella Panayotova (The Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge), Was the Psalter-Hours of Isabelle of France Restored in the Nineteenth Century?

Last booking date for this event: 26 November 2016. Standard fee: £95; students and Friends of the Fitzwilliam Museum: £70; AMARC members: £85.

Learn more or read all Abstracts

Petrarch Commentary & Exegesis (Warwick)

FELLOWSHIP: Three-year Postdoctoral Research Fellowship within AHRC-funded research project Petrarch Commentary and Exegesis in Renaissance Italy (c. 1350-c. 1650), University of Warwick, Coventry, Centre for Study of the Renaissance, Research Only. Salary: £28,982 – £37,768 pa.

This is a collaborative research project funded for 3 years, starting 1 January 2017, by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. The project aims to reconstruct the corpus of Italian Petrarch commentary and exegesis and to provide analysis in terms of genres, contents (including paratextual materials), readerships, and contexts in a variety of settings – academies, courts, universities, coteries of scholars, the print shop.

The project proposes to create the first freely available on-line census that will offer a searchable catalogue of all the Italian language commentaries and other main kinds of exegesis on Petrarch between 1350 and 1650. The postdoctoral fellow main duties will be to assist in the preparation of census and to undertake research publications related to analysis of Petrarch exegesis and commentary.

If you have not yet been awarded your PhD but are near submission or have recently submitted your PhD, any offers of employment will be made as Research Assistant on Level 5 of the University grade structure (£28,143 pa). Upon successful award of your PhD and evidence of this fact, you will be promoted to Research Fellow on the first point of level 6 of the University grade structure (£28,982 pa).

To serve as a research fellow on the recently awarded AHRC Grant ‘Petarch Commentary and Exegesis in Renaissance Italy (c. 1350-c. 1650)’ led by Prof. Simon Gilson (PI, Warwick), Dr. Federica Pich (Co-I, Leeds) and Dr. Guyda Armstrong (Co-I, Manchester). The project runs for three years from 1 January 2017 and is a collaboration between academic and library staff at Warwick, Leeds, Manchester and the John Rylands Research Institute. One researcher is sought at Warwick for this period, preferably beginning 1 January 2017.

To conduct research via databases, bibliographies, inventories, library research trips, and other materials, along lines previously agreed with Professor Gilson, to study the diffusion of exegesis on Petrarch in the Italian Renaissance. The nature of the materials to be examined will be determined through discussion with Professor Gilson and the project’s co-investigators, Drs Federica Pich at Leeds and Guyda Armstrong at Manchester.

To produce, in collaboration with the research team, an electronic census of manuscript and printed works relative to Italian exegetical activity related to Petrarch c.1350-c.1650. To write two substantial articles analysing relevant works and topics. To provide frequent reports on the research conducted, to assist in conference preparations and management of public events, including exhibitions, and a website, and to assist in preparing conference papers for publication.

You will also be expected to present your findings to international conferences and to promote this area of research, as appropriate, within local secondary schools.

Deadline: 11 September 2016. Interview date: 29 September 2016.

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Petrarch Commentary & Exegesis (Leeds)

FELLOWSHIP: Three-year Postdoctoral Research Fellowship within AHRC-funded research project, Petrarch Commentary and Exegesis in Renaissance Italy (c. 1350-c. 1650),  University of Leeds, Faculty of Arts, Humanities & Cultures, School of Languages, Cultures and Societies. Fixed term for 3 years, from 1 January 2017. Salary: £31,656 to £37,768 per annum.

The School of Languages, Cultures and Societies invites applications for one Postdoctoral Research Fellowship to be held from January 2017 for 36 months within a project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

This project, led by Prof. Simon Gilson (PI, Warwick), Dr. Federica Pich (Co-I, Leeds) and Dr. Guyda Armstrong (Co-I, Manchester), focuses on Petrarch commentary and exegesis in Renaissance Italy (c. 1350-c. 1650). The project runs for three years from 1 January 2017 and is a collaboration between academic and library staff at Warwick, Leeds, Manchester and the John Rylands Research Institute. One researcher is sought at Leeds for this period, preferably beginning 1 January 2017. A researcher will also be recruited to work with the team at Warwick.

The Post-doctoral Research Fellow is expected:

- to conduct research via databases, bibliographies, inventories, library research trips, and other materials, along lines previously agreed with Dr. Federica Pich, to study the diffusion of exegesis on Petrarch in the Italian Renaissance. The nature of the materials to be examined will be determined through discussion with Dr. Pich, Prof. Simon Gilson, the Principal Investigator (Warwick), Dr. Guyda Armstrong, the project’s other co-investigator (Manchester), and the John Rylands Research Institute;

- to produce, in collaboration with the research team, an electronic census of manuscript and printed works relative to Italian exegetical activity related to Petrarch c.1350-c.1650;

- to write two substantial articles analysing relevant works and topics;

- to provide frequent reports on the research conducted, to assist in conference preparations and management of public events, including exhibitions, and a website, and to assist in preparing conference papers for publication;

- to present his/her findings to international conferences and to promote this area of research, as appropriate, within local secondary schools.

Applicants will be expected to have obtained or expect to shortly obtain a PhD with specialisation in an aspect of Italian Studies or field relevant to the project.

Please indicate in your application or cover letter whether you intend to apply for i) the Leeds post only or ii) the Leeds andWarwick position.

Informal enquiries may be made to Dr. Federica Pich.

Deadline: 11 September 2016.

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Saints and Sinners: Queens Mary & Margaret

Margaret

CALL FOR PAPERS - Saints and Sinners: Literary Footprints of Mary and Margaret, Queens of Scots, The University of Edinburgh, The Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH), 6 – 7 October 2016.

This conference will focus on the two most famous Queens of Scots, St Margaret (d.1093) and Mary (d. 1587), exploring how female threat is represented and – potentially – neutralised in literature and visual culture across the medieval period. To date, little serious academic study of Margaret has been undertaken, and further study into Mary beyond her infamy and demise has been limited.

This conference seeks to both promote and explore the two most famous queens of Scots, both in terms of their literary and historical representation and in terms of their impact on the representation of Scottish queenship throughout the medieval period.

We wish to encourage study into the way prominent women, especially queens, attracted discussion on medieval gender roles. Margaret and Mary function as opposite sides of the Madonna/Whore, Saint/Sinner stereotypes that dominate female representation in the medieval period and through to the modern age, and this conference would also encourage all submissions that encompass female representation more widely, taking these two opposites as a basis.

Papers can address, but are not limited to, the topics of:
* Historical Context
* Reading and writing female experience
* Female book owners
* Queens as book owners and patrons
* Women and the Church
* Queens and Queenship
* Female literacy in the Middle Ages
* Religious iconography/relics
* Female voice (complaint, lyric, prayer)
* Modern adaptations of the stories.

This conference is open to all, particularly current graduate and early career researchers. We invite abstracts of up to 300 words for 20 minute papers, and a short CV. These should be sent to ssconf2016@gmail.com. There will be limited financial help available for graduate students and unwaged postdoctoral researchers to assist with travel.

Deadline: 31 August 2016.

Read more about IASH

The Lateran Basilica: A Conference

CONFERENCE - The Lateran Basilica: A Conference, The British School at Rome, Via Antonio Gramsci 61, Roma, 19 – 21 September 2016.

This interdisciplinary conference hosted by the British School at Rome, sponsored by Newcastle University, the Università degli Studi di Firenze and the University of Amsterdam School of Historical Studies and organised in conjunction with the Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome (KNIR). The convenors are Ian Haynes, Paolo Liverani and Lex Bosman.

The conference brings together specialists in archaeology, architecture, art history, history, liturgy and topography to discuss recent research on San Giovanni in Laterano. As the first public building for Christian worship and the Cathedral of the Bishop of Rome the site is of exceptional importance. Papers will address the origins of the site, its topographical context, the building, its history and its decorative scheme up to 1600.

Entry to the conference is free, but those wishing to attend are asked to register at lateran.conference@gmail.com by Sunday 18 September 2016.

Read more or view the programme

Job for Medievalists at ‘Speculum’

JOB: Editorial Assistant at Speculum.

Part-time intern position starting at the end of September to input bibliographical data and help with the book review process, including mailing books to reviewers.

The position is budgeted for 8 hours/week at $14 an hour and could be filled by an undergraduate or graduate student.

The job requires strong attention to detail and some bibliographic experience, while offering participation in the editing and production of Speculum.

Preference will be given to applicants in the Boston area able to work for the full academic year.

Please contact Sarah Spence to apply.

Il Breviario Grimani nell’Ottocento

Grimani

ARTICLE: Sara Filippin, Il Breviario Grimani e le sue riproduzioni fotografi- che nell’Ottocento, in MDCCC 1800, 5, 2016, pp. 71-111.

In the first half of the 1860s two photographic campaigns were conducted on the Grimani Breviary (Venice, Marciana Library): the first one by Antonio Perini, who in 1862 published the photographs of 110 miniatures among the most relevant of the manuscript; the second was realised around 1864 by initiative of the French publisher Léon Curmer, who aimed at publishing thirty-six chromolithographs taken from the same miniatures. Since then the Breviary was no longer photographed. On the basis of archival documents and the analysis of some copies of those reproductions, the paper shows that the negatives obtained by Perini were employed for further editions of the images in 1878, 1880-1881, 1903 and 1906.

Clicca qui se vuoi contattare Sara Filippin (Università degli Studi di Padova, Italia). Il contributo è consultabile e scaricabile gratuitamente (qui).

Bilderwelten erschliessen. 30 Jahre KdiH

CONFERENCE: Bilderwelten erschliessen. 30 Jahre Katalog der deutschsprachigen illustrierten Handschriften des Mittelalters (KdiH), Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften und Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München, 7 - 9 September 2016.

Seit 30 Jahren beschäftigt sich der „Katalog der deutschsprachigen illustrierten Handschriften des Mittelalters“ (KdiH) mit der wissenschaftlichen Erschließung von Text-Bild-Zusammenhängen. 1986 erschien die erste Lieferung des KdiH. Feiern Sie den 30. Geburtstag des Katalogs mit uns und kommen Sie zu unserer Tagung. Für alle Teilnehmenden an der Tagung ist auch ein Besuch der zeitgleich stattfindenden Ausstellung der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek „Bilderwelten – Buchmalerei zwischen Mittelalter und Neuzeit“ geplant.

Literarische Stoffe (im Französischen: matières) können im Mittelalter nicht nur durch ihre Verarbeitung im Text, sondern auch durch ihre Illustration und Übertragung in die Volkssprache neu interpretiert und aufgefasst werden. Bei der Deutung von Texttraditionen spiegeln sich unter anderem aktuelles Wissen, moralische Auslegungen, neueste Reflexionen oder sogar Umdeutungen wider. Dieser Text- und Bilderschließung von literarischen Traditionen im deutschsprachigen Raum sollen sich Vortragende bei der Jubiläumstagung des KdiH widmen.

Dabei können langfristig wirkende, ikonographische und literarische Traditionen oder kurzfristig auftauchende Einzelphänomene oder Experimente Gegenstand sein. Die Übertragung von Bildern und deutschsprachigen Texten in den frühen Buchdruck kann ebenso betrachtet werden wie mittelalterliche Text-Bild-Kombinationen, die über das Medium der Handschrift hinaus auf andere Objekte oder Medien verweisen (Kleinplastiken, Kleidung, Wandmalerei, Einblattholzschnitte etc.).

Ausgangspunkt der Überlegungen soll jedoch der in Handschriften überlieferte Text – von Gebrauchsliteratur über literarische Stoffe bis zu sakralen Texten – mit seinen möglichen Visualisierungs- und Erschließungsstrategien im deutschsprachigen Kontext bleiben.

Programm

Mittwoch, 7.9.2016, 13.30
Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Sitzungssaal 1, Plenarsaal
* Jan-Dirk Müller (München), Begrüßung
* Norbert H. Ott (München), Einführung.

Grenzfälle in Bild und Text
Moderation: Falk Eisermann, Berlin
* Elmar Hofman (Münster), Übersehene Bedeutungsträger. Text- und Wappensammlungs-Verhältnisse in mittelalterlichen deutschsprachigen Manu- skripten
* Margit Krenn (Heidelberg), Männer wie Fallobst. Bilder ohne (Kon-)Text?
* Isabel von Bredow (München), Hinführung zur Ausstellung: Werkstatt- gespräch “Gebetbücher”.

Bayerische Staatsbibliothek München
* Claudia Fabian und Karl-Georg Pfändtner, Begrüßung und Einführung in die Ausstellung Gemeinsamer Ausstellungsbesuch „Bilderwelten. Buchmalerei zwischen Mittelalter und Neuzeit“.

Donnerstag, 8.9.2016, 9.00
Grenzfälle in Bild und Text
Moderation: Ulrike Bodemann (München)
* Thomas Flum (Bamberg), Engelsturz und Genesis am Nordportal des Freiburger Münsterchors. Zum medialen Transfer am Oberrhein im 14. Jahrhundert
* Franziska Stephan (München), Werkstatt- gespräch “Losbücher”.

Verklammerungen von Bild und Text
Moderation: Lieselotte E. Saurma (Heidelberg)
* Wiebke Ohlendorf (Braunschweig), Der ‚wurt’ und die ‚künigin’. Über das Verhältnis von Titulus und Bild im Parzival
* Sabine Griese (Leipzig), Visualisierung des Wissens – Forschungsdaten zum „Werkstattverbund“ um Diebold Lauber, digitalisiert und vernetzt.

Moderation: Freimut Löser (Augsburg)
* Kristina Domanski (Basel), Werkstattgespräch “Karl der Große”
* Angila Vetter, Kiel und Sebastian Holtzhauer (Osnabrück), ‚Gotes ere‘ und ‚der werlde pris‘. Retextualisierung der ‚Kindheit Jesu‘ Konrads von Fußesbrunnen im Evangelienwerk des Österreichischen Bibelübersetzers
* Tünde Radek (Budapest), Bilderwelten in der Rezeptionsgeschichte der „Weltchronik” von Johannes de Utino († 1366) anhand der deutsch-sprachigen Handschriften.

Moderation: Nigel F. Palmer, Oxford
* Bernhard Schnell (Göttingen), Werkstattgespräch “Medizin”
* Sven Limbeck (Wolfenbüttel), Bilder als Medien alchemischer Erkenntnis. Das „Buch der Heiligen Dreifaltigkeit“ zwischen Mystik und Fachprosa
* Stavros Vlachos (Bremen), Ikonographische Besonderheiten und Umdeutungen in Passionstraktaten des späten 15. Jahrhunderts.

Plenarsaal
Moderation: Nicola Zotz (München)
Abendvortrag von Henrike Manuwald (Göttingen), Bilder und Bildung. ,Volkssprachigkeit‘ in der Frömmigkeitskultur des Spätmittelalters.

Freitag, 9.9.2016, 9.00
Verklammerungen von Bild und Text
Moderation: Ute von Bloh (Potsdam)
* Christina Henss (Zürich), ‚Machmet ein mörder?‘ Strategien zur Vereindeutigung in Text und Bild in der Episode über Mohammed und seinen christlichen Lehrer in Mandevilles Reisen
* Ulrike Bauer-Eberhardt, Karl-Georg Pfändtner und Bettina Wagner (München), Kunsthistorische Projekte am Handschriftenerschließungs-zentrum der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek.

Bild und Text im Zeitalter des Medienwandels
Moderation: Nikolaus Henkel (Hamburg)
* Catarina Zimmermann-Homeyer (Berlin), ‚Der figur klerliche erklerung‘. Didaktik und Ars memorativa in Text und Bild der ersten deutschen Gesamtausgabe der Terenz-Komödien von 1499
* Elke Anna Werner (Berlin), Die Anschaulichkeit der Geschichte. Bildliche Evidenzstrategien in der Spalatin-Chronik
* Helmut Puff (Ann Arbor), Bildunterschriften. Wort und Bild im Widerstreit
* Jan-Dirk Müller (München), Abschluss.

Abendvortrag im Plenarsaal der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften:
* Prof. Dr. Henrike Manuwald (Göttingen), Bilder und Bildung.

Source: H-ArtHist

Improving Access to BL Digitised Manuscripts

BL-bolg

NEWS: Improving Access to British Library’s Digitised Manuscripts, by Alison Hudson.

If you check the British Library’s online catalogue of Archives and Manuscripts today, you may notice an exciting change. Catalogue entries of many digitised manuscripts now feature a button linking directly to the digitised version of the manuscript.

You can find the link either by scrolling down the ‘Details’ tab or by looking in the tab labelled ‘I want this’, where a button linking to the digital version should appear first in the list of options.

Click on the blue hyperlink or the red ‘Go’ button, and a new tab will open in your browser containing the Digitised Manuscripts page for the relevant manuscript. We will soon have added hyperlinks to catalogue entries for all 1460+ of our digitised manuscripts.

Therefore, if you are planning a trip to the British Library or just looking up the details of a manuscript, you will be able to see immediately what is fully available 24/7 on Digitised Manuscripts.

There’s no need to wait for our quarterly masterlist of Digitised Manuscripts hyperlinks (although we will continue to release those) or to check the Digitised Manuscripts website separately.

We hope you will find this new tool useful. With almost 1500 manuscripts digitised, there is a lot to discover. Happy reading!

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DigiPal VI: The Palaeography Awakens…

CONFERENCE - DigiPal VI: The Palaeography Awakens…, King’s College London, Monday 5th September 2016, 9.30am-7pm.

Confirmed speakers include:

* Dauvit Broun, Assessing the Authenticity of Melrose Abbey’s Earliest Charter
* Emma Cayley, Rethinking Medieval Materiality: The Curious Case of the Hotel Carpet”
* Peter Cornwell, Rhetorics and Pragmatics of Sustainability in Research Employing Digital Methods”
* Vincenzo Damiani, Anagnosis: A Text-image Alignment Tool for Greek Papyri
* John Reuben Davies, Looking for Models in Holyrood and Melrose
* Anna Dlabačová and Giacomo Signore, Mapping Miscellanies. Possible Approaches to Miscellaneous Manuscript Analysis
* Charles Farris, The Challenge of Royal Wardrobe Accounts
* Tom Haines, My Text in Your Handwriting
* Alison Hudson, Archbishop Wulfstan’s School Days
* Débora Marques de Matos, SephardiPal as a Tool for Digital Connoisseur- ship
* Adi Keinan-Schoonbaert, Digitisation, Engagement and Digital Scholarship: The Hebrew Manuscripts Digitisation Project
* Erik Kwakkel, Reading an Invisible Manuscript: Using MA-XRF to Trace Medieval Fragments Inside Book Bindings
* Peter Stokes, MultiPal: Towards a Digital Palaeographical Approach to Multigraphism
* Tessa Webber, Dating Charters and Tracing Influence with Models of Authority.

The Symposium will include refreshments and lunch. If you’d like to attend, then please register via Eventbrite. There’s no charge for registration, but please do register so that we know how many we need to cater for.

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Dante and the Visual Arts

Dante

CONFERENCE; Dante and the visual arts, Los Angeles, University of California, UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and the J. Paul Getty Museum, 22 – 24 August 2016. Advance registration not required.

This symposium is devoted to the study of the most important editions of the Comedy and of other visualizations of Dante’s masterpiece that were printed in the sixteenth century, and the analysis of the most important aspects and relationships that may emerge. Topics to be investigated are the relationship between text and image; the hermeneutic importance of the image; and, the criteria by which a particular description has been selected to be represented visually in any given canto.

As part of the research project Envisioning the Word: Dante and the Visual Arts 1300-1500, this conference is dedicated to examining the illustrative tradition of the Divine Comedy. The purpose of the project and the previous conferences has been to explore in a systematic and exhaustive manner the meaning, value, characteristics, modalities and functions of the vast tradition of manuscripts, printed editions, and other artistic endeavors (frescoes, paintings, sculptures etc.) that draw their inspiration and their raison d’être in the desire to reproduce iconographically Dante’s vision.

Project collaborators include the journal Dante e l’Arte, the Società dantesca Italiana, the Institut d’Estudis Medievals at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, and the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

Programme

Tuesday, 23 August 2016
UCLA Humanities Building, Room 193
* Massimo Ciavolella (Director, CMRS), Welcoming remarks
* Rossend Arqués (Symposium organizer), Welcoming remarks.

* Rossend Arqués (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona), Il linguaggio artistico e i commenti della Commedia nel ‘500
* Angelo Eugenio Mecca (Independent scholar), Iconografia e filologia: dai manoscritti alle stampe
* Luca Marcozzi (Università di Roma Tre), Images of the Other World in early Cinquecento Print Editions of Dante’s Commedia
* Bronwen Wilson (UCLA), Stone Matters: Sandro Botticelli and His Drawings for Dante’s Inferno
* Claudia Ceri Via (Università di Roma “La Sapienza”), ‘Visibile parlare.’ Ombre e immagini silenziose nella Commedia dantesca
* Silvia Maddalo (Università di Viterbo “La Tuscia”), Poesia in figura: il Purgatorio dantesco di Luca Signorelli a Orvieto.

Wednesday, 24 August 2016
UCLA Humanities Building, Room 193
* Donato Pirovano (Università di Torino), La Nova esposizione visualizzata di Alessandro Vellutello
* Barbara Stoltz (Universität Marburg), Literary Criticism and Theory of Art at the end of the 16th Century: Federico Zuccaro’s ‘Dante historiato’.

UCLA Library Special Collections visit
* Paolo Procaccioli (Università della Tuscia, Viterbo), Tra geometria e topografia. L’itinerarium a Dante di Alessandro Vellutello
* Lia Markey (The Newberry Library), Dante Visualized: Giovanni Stradano and Luigi Alamanni’s Drawings for Prints.

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The Early Modern Book Trade

FELLOWSHIPS: The Early Modern Book Trade: An Evidence-based Reconstruction of the Economic and Juridical Framework of the European Book Market, Principal Investigator: Prof. Angela Nuovo, Università di Udine (Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici e del Patrimonio culturale). Duration in months: 60 months.

This project “EMoBookTrade” will explore the idea and gather the evidence to prove it that the so-called printing revolution does not consist in a change in book-making technology but in the process, prolonged over the entire course of the early modern age, of the formation of the printed book market and the creation of readers as purchasers and consumers of books.

In order to demonstrate this, the project will reconstruct the economic and legal framework of the European book market by applying an interdisciplinary approach to the economic study of book history.

By using unique and hitherto unexplored documentary evidence, this project addresses four fundamental questions relating to the growth of a fully developed book trade and the rise of a society of book consumers within the social and religious context of early modern Europe:

- the economic issue of book prices;

- the juridical and political issue of the book privilege system (which in turn influenced the process of book pricing);

- the management of the bookselling business (focusing on businesses in two major cities in the European book trade, Venice (Bernardino Giunti) and Antwerp (Christopher Plantin);

- the technique of building and managing a transnational network for book distribution and sale (analyzing groundbreaking new evidence, an entire year (1522) of correspondence from a Venetian wholesale bookseller (Giovanni Bartolomeo Gabiano).

These four research areas will feed into an overarching project which will examine the impact of books and the access of readers to them, together with the development in patterns of cultural consumption which meant that printed books lost the luxury status which they had had throughout the incunabula period to become transformed into ‘popoluxe’ goods.

Cinque assegni di ricerca sono ora messi a bando sui seguenti argomenti:

1. I prezzi dei libri nell’Europa della prima età moderna: liste commerciali, cataloghi a stampa di editori e librai italiani, i prezzi dei libri di una biblioteca privata venduta all’asta (1608). Assegno di € 23.400,00.

2. I prezzi dei libri nell’Europa della prima età moderna: l’archivio di un editore-libraio (Christopher Plantin), cataloghi a stampa di editori e librai francesi. Assegno di € 33.000,00.

3. Gestione di una bottega libraria e prezzi dei libri all’inizio del XVII secolo. Assegno di € 23.400,00.

4. Il sistema dei privilegi librari a Venezia (secoli XV-XVI). Assegno di € 19.600,00.

5. I prezzi dei libri e la crescita dei consumi culturali. Assegno di € 23.400,00.

Gli assegni di ricerca, della durata di 1 anno, sono rinnovabili per altri 3 anni (4 anni complessivi).

Deadline for proposals: 20 September 2016. Interviews:  28 September 2016.

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