Out of the Margins

margins

CONFERENCE: Out of the Margins: New Ideas on the Boundaries of Medieval Studies, Faculty of English, University of Cambridge (9 West Road, Cambridge), 19 – 20 September 2014.

A conference to celebrate the Tenth Anniversary of Marginalia: The Journal of the Cambridge Medieval Reading Group (click here).

From the borders of material texts to the peripheries of society, the margins of medieval culture have been brought into unprecedented prominence by several generations of scholars across a wide range of disciplines. But have we over-privileged the radical, the liminal and the subversive? Or is it only by means of the edges that the centre can be defined at all? As interested in the edges of the material text as the fringes of society, and with a unique question to ask about how the marginal relates to the central narratives of medieval studies, we intend this conference to be both interdisciplinary and metadisciplinary.

Topics of papers will include:
* TEXTUAL AND MANUSCRIPT MARGINS: What is articulated between the edge and the middle? The manuscript margins can be a site of confirmation, conversation or controversy—from the authoritative gloss to the casual doodle.
* INTELLECTUAL MARGINS: Boundaries, relations and tensions between the ‘clerical’ and the ‘lay’; the ‘latinate’ and the ‘vernacular’; the literary and the theological.
* RADICAL MARGINS: Controversial or heretical texts, individuals and groups. The question of the extent and generosity of ‘orthodoxy’ and its more or less hostile relationship to the ‘subversive’ or ‘heretical’.
* SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC MARGINS: Voices of the poor, women, of the non-elite and the ‘outcast’ in the Middle Ages, the queer, as well as those who might be considered—but need not always have been—socially ‘on the edge’?
* NEOMEDIEVALISM: How the medieval borders onto and interrogates modernity, and how postmodern critique may elucidate aspects of the pre-modern…and vice versa.

We are delighted to announce that Dr Máire Ní Mhaonaigh has confirmed that she will giving a plenary lecture at the conference, joining the Professor Mary Carruthers, who will be giving our keynote address, and Professor Helen Cooper, who will also be giving a plenary. Dr Ní Mhaonaigh is a lecturer in the Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, and her work on early and high medieval Irish Literature and history will widen our ‘margins’ both temporal and geographical to provide an earlier British perspective on the conference’s themes.

Deadline for registration: 10 September 2014.

Learn more or visit the website

Marginalia (Website)

WEBSITE: Marginalia. The Website of the Medieval Reading Group at the University of Cambridge.

This website has been created by graduate students of medieval English literature at the University of Cambridge. Although much of the material and resources presented on the pages website is directed towards the study of the literature of the Middle Ages, we intend that this site will evolve into both a useful collection of resources and also a point of contact for medievalists both at Cambridge and around the world who are engaged in the study of medieval English literature, history, culture, and thought.

The Marginalia Committee (Journal of the Medieval Reading Group, University of Cambridge) are delighted to announce that they will be holding a Tenth Anniversary Conference on September 19th and 20th, 2014. The conference is entitled Out of the Margins: New Ideas on the Boundaries of Medieval Studies and our confirmed speakers include Professor Mary Carruthers, Professor Helen Cooper and Dr Máire Ní Mhaonaigh.

Deadline for registration: 10 September 2014.

Learn more

Marginalia (Journal)

NEWS: Marginalia. The Journal of the Medieval Reading Group at the University of Cambridge.

Marginalia is an online, peer-reviewed journal for medievalists, which aims to fill a gap in the publishing world by creating a vehicle for graduate publication. It sprang out of, and continues to be closely associated with, the Cambridge-based Medieval Reading Group, which was formed by Katie Walter in Easter term 2004. The aim of the reading group was to build community amongst graduate medievalists, and foster interdisciplinary approaches. Three further figures, Ingrid Abreu Scherer, Mary Flannery, and Anke Timmermann, became involved in this endeavour, and decided to open up this community to an international network using the wonders of the worldwide web. The first issue of the journal came out in 2005, and since then two issues have been released each year: one yearbook issue, showcasing some of the best work from the Cambridge MPhil in Medieval Literature; and a themed issue which invites submissions from graduate students in any discipline, working on the medieval period.

Learn more or visit the website

Foyles and The Love for Books

Foyles

NEWS: Foyles Bookshop now open at 107 Charing Cross Road, London.

The new Foyles flagship at 107 Charing Cross Road houses a range of over 200,000 different titles on four miles (6.5km) of shelves – the equivalent of lining one bank of the Thames with books from Battersea Power Station to the Tower of London. With 37,000 square feet of retail space, spread across eight alternating foot-plates over four floors, it is the largest bookshop to have opened in the UK so far this century. Alongside books, we have a wide range of gifts and stationery, magazines, printed music, classical music CDs and Classic and World DVDs as well as Ray’s Jazz, Grant & Cutler Foreign Languages, a Cafe and an Auditorium. An impressive full height central atrium and large windows fill the space with natural light, while the layout allows for easy navigation and the serendipitous discovery of new books.

Foyles, which was founded in 1903 by brothers William and Gilbert Foyle, first opened on Charing Cross Road in 1906 and moved to its location at 113-119 Charing Cross Road in 1929. Declared by William Foyle to be ‘the world’s first purpose-built bookshop’, it quickly became one of the capital’s most well-known literary landmarks. William’s daughter, Christina, built friendships with some of the leading writers of the time and pioneered bookshop author events, beginning a lecture series in the 1920s and founding the famous Foyles Literary Luncheons in 1930. The move to 107 Charing Cross Road in June 2014 marks a new chapter for our world-renowned, family-owned bookshop.

We employ more than 80 expert booksellers who will be happy to offer any help or advice you may need. Whilst these days most bookshops are stocked by books bought centrally from head office and distributed across the chain, at Foyles our heads of department are also our buyers, so they truly are experts in their stock and subjects.

You can find out more about the history of Foyles here

Watch the timelapse video by The Guardian.

Visit all Store Departments

Digital and Traditional Manuscripts

CONFERENCE: Digital and Traditional Manuscripts: Challenges of a Great Migration, 6th International Conference of the Manuscript Librarians Expert Group, Copenhagen, The Royal Library, The Black Diamond (Søren Kierkegaards Plads 1), Blixen Room, 9 – 11 October 2014. No conference fee.

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

Thursday, 9 October 2014, 13:00
Challenge 1. Preserving Born Digital Material
* Chris Prom (University of Illinois), Acquiring and Preserving Digital Archives
* Ivan Boserup (RL, Cph), My Archive: A Non-exclusive Solution to Born Digital Personal Archives
* Speaker to be confirmed, Net Art: Preserving Digital, Interactive Art
* Henrik Smith-Sivertsen (RL, Cph), Problems of Web-archiving of a Digital Social Event.

Challenge 2. Creating New Digital Contents with New Technology: Interoperability, Crowdsourcing
* Matthieu Bonicel (BnF, Paris), The Biblissima Project, Middle Ages and Renaissance
* Henrik Dupont (RL, Cph), Crowdsourcing: Denmark Seen From the Air
* Karen Skovgaard-Petersen (Danish Soc.for Lang. & Litt.), Digital Editing: The Born Digital Edition of the Collected Works of Ludvig Holberg (1684-1754).

Friday, 10 October 2014
Challenge 3. Reuniting Digitally Dispersed Items, Archives, and Collections
* Fragmentarium Team (Univ. of Fribourg), Fragmentarium. An International Research Environment
* Jutta Weber (SBB, Berlin), The Humboldt Papers
* Cultures of Knowledge Team (Oxford), Networking the Republic of Letters,1550-1750
* Frédéric Lemmers (Nat. Libr. of Belgium), Europeana Collections 1914-1918
* Gerhard Müller (SBB, Berlin), The New Kalliope Database (Letters in German language libraries).

Challenge 4. Promoting Digital Discovery: Reports on Selected National and International. Resources: Databases, Networks, Services, and Portals
* Portals to Archives of the UK
* Bibale and Other Services of the Institut de Recherche et d’Histoire des Textes
* The Patrimonio Database of Spanish Libraries
* The Manus Database of Italian Manuscript Collections
* The CERL Portal (Manuscripts and Rare Books).

Saturday, 11 October 2014
Challenge 5. Making Use of Advanced Technical Opportunities
* Lukasz Kozak (Warzsawa), Medieval Manuscripts on the Web: Memes or Discarded Images?
* EROMM Team (UL Göttingen), The New EROMM Web Search: Access to Facsimiles of Manuscripts
* Jutta Weber (SBB, Berlin), The CERL Manuscript Librarians Expert Group
* CERL Team (The Hague), Workshops of the LIBER Cultural Heritage Forum.

Please send an email to Ivan Boserup at the Royal Library as soon as possible and before 15 September 2014 (Max 100 attendees). Abstracts will be circulated c. 15 September.

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Communities in Communication

EXHIBITION: Communities in Communication: Languages and Cultures in the Low Countries, 1450-1530, The John Rylands Library, The University of Manchester, 17 July – 21 December 2014.

The Middle Ages are commonly seen as a time of widespread ignorance and prejudice, but diversity and multiculturalism are not modern inventions. Perhaps surprisingly, examples can be found in medieval Europe.

Drawing on the Library’s collections of manuscripts and printed books from the late 15th to early 16th centuries, Communities in Communication explores how the shared experience of different traditions and languages inspired a culture of mutual respect and integration.

Highlight objects in the exhibition include The Golden Legend, printed by William Caxton in 1483; Boetius De consolatione philosophie (The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius), a printed book from 1485 sumptuously bound in velvet and silk; and a printed Book of Hours from 1494 with beautifully hand-coloured illustrations which echo the illuminated manuscripts of the earlier medieval period.

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Remarkable Works, Remarkable Times

Huntington

EXHIBITION: Remarkable Works, Remarkable Times: Highlights from the Huntington Library, permanent exhibition at The Huntington Library, 1151 Oxford Rd, San Marino, California.

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens reopens the Main Exhibition Hall of its historic library building to the public after a 17-month-long reinstallation and renovation project with a new, dynamic permanent exhibition. Remarkable Works, Remarkable Times: Highlights from the Huntington Library is designed to invigorate visitors’ sense of connection to history and literature and to highlight the significance and uses of the library’s incomparable collections of historical materials.

The Huntington’s library is one of the largest and most in-depth independent research libraries in the United States in its fields of specialization: British and American history, literature, art, and the history of science stretching from the 11th century to the present. The new permanent installation in the Main Exhibition Hall of the institution’s original library building, highlights about 150 objects from the library’s collection, which currently numbers nearly 9 million items.

The exhibition is organized around 12 key objects, each anchoring a section. Major items on display include the Ellesmere manuscript of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, the Gutenberg Bible, Shake­speare’s First Folio, John James Audubon’s Birds of America, and Henry David Thoreau’s manuscript of Walden.

Each section in the exhibition incorporates other rare works to reflect the key item’s time and place, prompting visitors to make connections and consider a wider context. The goal is to provide unexpected juxtapositions and new insights into the collections, and into history itself.

For example, a First Folio edition of Shakespeare’s collected plays (1623) is displayed in a section called A Book of Plays by a Genius alongside books that inspired Shakespeare, works by his contemporaries, and rare items that reflect the world he lived in—from the British colonization of the New World to the writings of Galileo.

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Corso di Formazione sulla Musica nel Medioevo

COURSE: Corso di Formazione sulla Musica nel Medioevo. Problemi di classificazione e metodi della bibliografia, Settima edizione, Fondazione Ezio Franceschini, via Montebello 7, Firenze, 22 – 25 ottobre 2014.

Il Corso di Formazione sulla Musica nel Medioevo. Problemi di classificazione e metodi della bibliografia nasce dall’intento di valorizzare e condividere con un ampio numero di studiosi l’esperienza di Medioevo musicale, banca dati bibliografica e discografica realizzata all’interno della Sezione Musica «Matilde Fiorini Aragone», i cui aggiornamenti sono annual- mente pubblicati in forma cartacea nell’omonimo repertorio periodico.

Il corso si articola secondo tre linee formative:
* le tecniche bibliografiche
* l’impiego delle risorse informatiche
* l’approfondimento dei temi corrispondenti alle diverse sezioni di Medioevo musicale.

Le edizioni più recenti del corso, tenute in Umbria, a Collazzone, con la collaborazione dell’Amministrazione Comunale, si sono svolte in concomi- tanza di un convegno internazionale di musicologia medievale.

Scadenza presentazione domande: 20 settembre 2014.

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